The Drawer Boy

SEPTEMBER 7-9, 14-16, 21-23, 28-30 2017
Atellier Virginianne 1078 Drouillaird Windsor

Ghost Light Players opened its Third Season with a Modern Canadian Classic.

Ghost Light Players, the company that brought you the award winning Voices of Vimy and Better Living,  was proud to present their first in a season of all Canadian productions with Michael Healey’s The Drawer Boy. The production was directed by Carol Reid.

It’s 1972 and Miles, an idealistic, ebullient young actor from Toronto, knocks on the door of an isolated farmhouse somewhere in rural Ontario. He hopes to move in with Morgan and Angus, two middle-aged bachelor farmers, to watch and learn about their lives and write a play about them and country life. Morgan has taken care of his friend Angus, ever since he suffered a head injury during World War II. As Miles learns more about the two farmers, the nature of their extraordinary relationship comes to the surface.

HAILED AS ONE OF THE TOP TEN PLAYS OF 2001 BY TIME MAGAZINE AND WINNER OF NEARLY EVERY CANADIAN THEATRE AWARD POSSIBLE, “THE DRAWER BOY” IS A HUMOROUS AND HEARTWARMING PLAY ABOUT THE SIMPLE PLEASURES OF FRIENDSHIP, STORYTELLING, AND REMEMBRANCE.

The Drawer Boy was originally produced at Theatre Passé Muraille in Toronto in February 1999.

“The play speaks about the power of theatre to hold a mirror to our lives, and the responsibility of those artists that do so,” says director Carol Reid. “It deals with the power of story telling – the stories that we tell, that we believe, and those that define us. It asks who has the right to tell these stories.”

Better Living

February 2-4, 9-11, 2017
The Bank Theatre and Meeting Place

Better Living is a Canadian piece, written by George F. Walker in the late 80s. This play is the second in a series of plays called The East End plays, and all tend to feature the same characters and follow their lives and developments. In this particular place, we focus on the family surrounding Gail, the youngest of three sisters. She has just moved back home with her criminal boyfriend Junior and is trying to deal the idiosyncrasies of her mother, Nora.

Meanwhile, Gail’s sisters have come home as well, which brings so much happiness to Nora, since the disappearance of her husband. Truth is, Nora and her brother, a priest doubting his faith, Jack have attempted and possibly succeeded in killing Tom. Tom was a bully and a dictator that had a profound effect on everyone in the family.

There is also Elizabeth, a former prostitute who has become a lawyer and is now focusing  on politics. And then there is Maryanne the weak sister who can’t handle motherhood or marriage and has run from both.

None of this matters a whit to Nora who’s more than happy to be there to oversee and support her children.

All of that changes when Tom returns, and with him, his draconian policies.

Voices of Vimy

November 11, 12, 13 2016
The Bank Theatre and Meeting Place
November 17, 18, 19 2016
SHŌ – art spirit performance

Ghost Light Players Honoured Our Vets With Locally Written Play

Local playwright John Conlon’s Voices of Vimy, was performed by the Ghost Light Players team, at The Bank Theatre and at SHŌ – art spirit performance.

John Conlon is a local author and with this piece opens an important discussion about the effects of war on those who served – namely post traumatic stress disorder. The story also speaks to the history of Canadian heroism in times of war – in this case, The Great War.

The play, which ran at two venues, was directed by Dean Valentino, and features a stellar cast from within our community: Lucas Guignard, Jeffery Bastien, Niki Richardson, Chris Lanspeary, Mysteria Baylis-Harris, Kris Simic and Brett Hallick.

“Here, we have a great cast from an outstanding theatre group, in two perfect and intimate venues, performing a piece that is very topical, speaking about what happens to our veterans,” says director Dean Valentino. “In some cases, it’s worse than actually being in the war.”

“I am proud to be directing a piece that speaks to the core of Remembrance Day; speaks to why we wear the poppy. Not to the politics but to the soldiers who put their lives on the line.”